Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)


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To make reins easier to hold, they might be attached to a single small oblong block, or to bicycle handlebars. TM For riders with impaired vision, at SpiritHorse Therapeutic Rid- ing Center, Corinth, Texas, two dressage whips are taped together by the handles, with the tips pointing outward in opposite directions, and fastened to the saddle front. As the rider moves along the rail in a round pen, he can feel and hear when the tip of a whip touches the fence.

Special Needs, Special Horses

TM A preverbal rider at SpiritHorse is coached with a small recorder at- tached to the saddle front. Most rid- ers soon learn pressing the button causes the horse and three people to start moving. LEADER Before leading with a rider up, volunteers are required to go through leader training, even though they may be experienced in equine han- dling. They are taught to be constantly aware of the surroundings, and anticipate anything that might cause the horse to shy, such as an object blowing in the wind, or a person or vehicle in the vicinity likely to make an unexpected motion or sound.

They must be alert to instantly follow. In demonstrating the technique of an emergency dismount, Rocky Top Head Instructor Jake Bond related seeing a pound woman take off a pound man and he stayed on his feet. An actual emergency occurs so rarely that most volunteers never experience one. This training is repeated periodically to keep them alert and prepared in the unlikely event of a startling incident—like an insur- ance policy we hope never to use.

There are many ways to prompt the rider to carry out the instruc- tion—verbally, sign language, a tap on the hand, or pantomiming the action. Another way is for the rider to wear a wide belt, with handles for the volunteers to grip, which helps them maintain a secure hold. During a session where the sidewalkers hold a rider in this manner, they may switch sides to rest their arms.

They do this one at a time. The rider is never left without support. Others, exert- ing their independence, do not want to be touched at all. The volunteers stay close for safety, and to help center the rider if the instructor sees he has become off balance. The most common type of dismount, for a child or adult, is to the ground.

If required, he is eased into his chair, which has been positioned near the horse. The usual tack is a western or English saddle, although a bareback pad is occasionally used for simple vaulting type exercises. For begin- ning riders, reins are fastened directly onto the halter. These reins have bilateral bands of color so the instructor can tell the rider where to hold them for a particular maneuver.

Even for advanced riders, the horse always wears a halter under the bridle.


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When exiting an enclosed area, such as going to and from an outdoor arena, a leader will have control with a rope snapped onto the halter. Leaving some slack in the rope allows the client to continue guiding his mount with the reins. Depending on experience, skill level, physical and emotional needs, the rider will be assigned two sidewalkers, only one, or none at all. Volunteers might hold a knee or ankle in the beginning.

A single sidewalker usually stays on the opposite side from the leader.

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Finally, only a leader is assigned, who doubles as a sidewalker. Independent riders take complete control of their mounts, while we walk alongside, in position to offer any as- sistance that might be needed. Most independent riders mount from a two-step block, or from the ground, although some use the mounting platform. Sessions include polishing riding skills, playing games and learning the procedures for upcoming horse shows. The Warm-up: Physically and mentally preparing for work.

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Review: Skills from previous classes pertaining to lesson are repeat- ed. It could be going in a circle, at a walk, clockwise, then reversing direction for a counterclockwise circle. Games: Lesson is completed with a game that is fun, and helps con- nect with the new skill learned. Tossing rings of different colors onto a peg might reinforce walking in circles.


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There are many variations to this outline. Procedures are tailored to the ability and experience of the riders. No one in her family, or any friends, had horses so she had never been around them. Two months shy of her sev- enth birthday, she was diagnosed with leukemia.


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Two years into che- motherapy treatment, she developed an aneurysm which resulted in multiple strokes, affecting all four quadrants of her brain. The medical opinion was that she would never walk or talk again. With her love of horses, she naturally turned to them once again. A year after her aneurysm, still in a wheelchair, she began a riding program. Already knowing how to control her horse, it was only a matter of re- gaining strength and balance before her need of sidewalker assistance dwindled and she achieved independent rider status. She switched from a western to an English saddle, which provides less support, therefore building even greater strength and balance for the rider.

At thirteen, Amy posted very well. She began entering all the events for which she is eligible, mainly English Equitation and Trail, and enjoys displaying her trophies and ribbons to family and friends. They have mounted from the block, and the group is circling the indoor arena with leaders at halter. I am leading a gelding named Pizan for Amy who is riding her usual English saddle.

Special Needs Special Horses A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding Practical Guide

Amy and Bob stay on the rail and everyone else come into the center. I ask Amy if she wants support while trotting. I run along close beside. Your posting is excellent. Maneuvering the course is good practice, even for those not planning. Amy, an enthusiastic entry in the show, takes the practice very seri- ously as she guides her mount over a set of ground poles, and reins him around a barrel. The ground poles are placed to make a square enclosure to serve as the jail.

Volunteers and parents play the robbers. The game gives the riders great reining practice, and their laughter shows how much fun they are having, particularly those who are chas- ing a parent. The session is over and we untie the lead ropes to lead the horses back to the main arena. The leaders hold the horses in position as long as clients are in the arena. Many bring carrots or apples for their mount no sugar cubes al- lowed. A session, always with only one client, requires a therapist physical, occupational, speech pathologist, or assistant, who is also trained to administer hippotherapy , a leader, and one or two sidewalkers.

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Support is given according to individual need, which may be mini- mal, or the maximum, where volunteers actually hold the rider upright, sometimes using a wide belt with handles. The preferred tack is a bareback pad or anti-cast wide, heavy leath- er surcingle, with a half-moon handle for the rider to hold over a pad. This helps the rider feel and absorb more warmth and motion from the horse than he would from a saddle of heavy leather.

A saddle is used if additional support is needed, or for the client to progress to standing up in the stirrups. Objects are sometimes utilized to facilitate stretching, better pos- ture, etc. A rider holds a baton in various positions, such as behind his back or over his head; a child takes large rings from a sidewalker, held as directed by the therapist so the client must stretch sideways, back- ward or up to reach them. He began a hippotherapy program when he was three years old, unable to walk, or sit up straight unaided.

He was afraid he would fall. He sat more erect, without holding on, indicating developed trunk strength. After only four weeks, Cory walked twenty-four steps independent- ly. He followed that in the next few days with increasing numbers of steps, including turns. This certainly gives him a lot more mobility. Ready to ride today? Volunteer Janet Venner has groomed and tacked Mo with a halter and lead rope, anti-cast and pad.

She is leading the dun gelding a few laps around the arena to warm him up. Janet stops Mo behind the mounting area to wait until the therapist asks her to lead the horse in. Walking backward, Janet leads Mo in between the platforms.

Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)
Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding (Practical Guide)

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